Thoughts on Feminism

From basic rights to rape culture to LGBTQIA issues to patriarchy, we discuss it all.

egoting:

Some pictures from the rally today at Columbia. So much wonderful support for my sister and I! Emma and I are truly grateful to everyone who came, and everyone who was there in spirit.

(via booknerdjenny)

If I could,
I would turn girls into dragons.

Girls whose skin
has been stained by filthy hands,
girls who are forced
to face those familiar hands
day after day,

give them armor.

Girls who are told
that womanhood means duty,
who dig
and sweat
and carry
and labor,
girls who break their backs
on someone else’s burden,

give them spiked spines.

Girls trapped in cycles:
cycles of abuse
addiction
poverty
pain
cycles they can’t even name,
cycling
cycling
down the drain
and thrown out with the bathwater,

give them claws.

Girls
who chomp down on fear
hiding behind their teeth,
who swallow it whole
because it’s the only nourishment they’ll get,

give them razor fangs.

Girls
who thirst for knowledge
in the middle of a drought,
girls whose minds
are considered as real as their suffering,

give them fire
to burst from their mouths
in place of the words that no one hears.

Girls
whose bodies are not their own;
who are meant for decoration
and cannot decorate themselves,
who are meant for pleasure
and cannot pleasure themselves,
who are meant to be examples
and cannot exemplify themselves,

give them wings
to fly far, far away,

taste freedom in the sky,
and see it for what it should be:
a right, not a privilege.

Every girl
who is considered a possession
or a prize
or a plaything,

who lives
confined by people
who call condescension “love”
and manipulation “compromise”
and fear “respect”
and silence “consent,”

give her eyes
that strike terror into the heart
of anyone who would call her weak.

Gift girls with dragonhood
when personhood is a myth.

grannywasjungonce:

'Zitkala-Ša, a Yankton Sioux Native American woman who made her mark as a champion of Native American rights and as an accomplished author and musician. She and her husband, Raymond Bonnin, founded the National Council of American Indians in 1926 to advocate for full citizenship rights for Native Americans.’

grannywasjungonce:

'Zitkala-Ša, a Yankton Sioux Native American woman who made her mark as a champion of Native American rights and as an accomplished author and musician. She and her husband, Raymond Bonnin, founded the National Council of American Indians in 1926 to advocate for full citizenship rights for Native Americans.’

(Source: feverfuckery, via vintagegal)

This video is about eleven minutes long but worth the watch. It’s a French film with English subtitles about a world where men and women have switched places. I am going to put a trigger warning for sexual violence and harassment. It is very very good.

~Victoria~

Journalist Ida B. Wells was an avid suffragist and an early Civil Rights leader, who used the power of the pen to challenge racial & sexual discrimination. In 1892, Wells published “Southern Horrors: Lynch Laws in All Its Phases” a scathing exposé of lynching practices. In retaliation for her articles, a mob destroyed her Memphis printing press, and after numerous threats to her life, Wells moved to Chicago to continue her anti-lynching campaign. Learn more about Wells in our online exhibit: http://bit.ly/1lIclqX(Via National Women’s History Museum) 
These are the women that I think of when I get up in the morning. These are the women I remember when I leave the house to go to work, wearing pants and a sweatshirt. These are the women I remember when I get my ballot and read over it. When I go to classes to get an education. When I drink in a bar or state my opinion loudly.
Women like Ida Wells are the reason that we have so much now. Suffragists stood up for what they wanted and were beaten, threatened, treated like animals, all because they wanted what most men were given at birth. These women fought, they fought to make sure their daughters could have just as good a world as their sons. These are the women that I believe the anti-feminist movement spits on. I see their signs and listen to what they say and I think of these women. It is something I will never understand and probably will always find insulting. These women, these Feminists risked and gave all to give us what we have now, wanting to continue what they started isn’t wrong. It isn’t hating men. Or wanting to be men, as most believed in their times, it’s wanting to stand on even ground. To look over and know that my opinion would be just as valued as his.
This also hits that second level for me. To know that even to this day, we’re struggling to have the issues of race recognized in this country. It is astounding how long people of color can be looked down upon for something they couldn’t change. It really is the bad sort of amazing.
~Victoria~

Journalist Ida B. Wells was an avid suffragist and an early Civil Rights leader, who used the power of the pen to challenge racial & sexual discrimination. In 1892, Wells published “Southern Horrors: Lynch Laws in All Its Phases” a scathing exposé of lynching practices. In retaliation for her articles, a mob destroyed her Memphis printing press, and after numerous threats to her life, Wells moved to Chicago to continue her anti-lynching campaign. Learn more about Wells in our online exhibit: http://bit.ly/1lIclqX
(
Via National Women’s History Museum) 

These are the women that I think of when I get up in the morning. These are the women I remember when I leave the house to go to work, wearing pants and a sweatshirt. These are the women I remember when I get my ballot and read over it. When I go to classes to get an education. When I drink in a bar or state my opinion loudly.

Women like Ida Wells are the reason that we have so much now. Suffragists stood up for what they wanted and were beaten, threatened, treated like animals, all because they wanted what most men were given at birth. These women fought, they fought to make sure their daughters could have just as good a world as their sons. These are the women that I believe the anti-feminist movement spits on. I see their signs and listen to what they say and I think of these women. It is something I will never understand and probably will always find insulting. These women, these Feminists risked and gave all to give us what we have now, wanting to continue what they started isn’t wrong. It isn’t hating men. Or wanting to be men, as most believed in their times, it’s wanting to stand on even ground. To look over and know that my opinion would be just as valued as his.

This also hits that second level for me. To know that even to this day, we’re struggling to have the issues of race recognized in this country. It is astounding how long people of color can be looked down upon for something they couldn’t change. It really is the bad sort of amazing.

~Victoria~

the-spooky-dick-forest:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

athinikli:

bloglikeanegyptian:

another installment of my comic, featuring Qahera the hijabi superhero! this time its mostly about sexual harassment - and the majority of the themes in this comic are based on real experiences with street harassment.

for enlarged version 

part 1 | part 2

YES FUCKING YES

I NEED COMICS UPON COMICS OF THIS

  •  a comic about a woman with headscarf and full-body-suit
  • being extremly awesome and kickass
  • not over-sexualized but still good-looking
  • FEMALE SUPERHEROES - YOU ARE DOING IT RIGHT

I didn’t even get halfway through this before I started to cry. Being doubted or told that maybe it was you is the worst feeling. There need to be more things showing it as wr9ng, as perpetuating the problem. ~Victoria~

(via readingaroundthemovies)

A man came to our class once,
he claimed to be a fair judge
with daughters he loved.

He asked a question to the class:
“When should a minor be tried
as an adult?”
and students began raising their hand

“murder”
he wrote it up on the board.

“robbery”
he wrote it up on the board.

I said, “Rape”
and he paused, he asked
for clarification

“You mean violent rape?”

“no I mean rape.
It is all the same.”

he looked to a boy
who said “rape only if
he used a weapon and
hurt her.”

and I said, “rape is rape,
whether his weapon is a knife,
drugs, or guilt. She said no.”

he shook his head,
and wrote
“Violent rape” on the board
anyways.

I never understood,
because you can kill somebody
quietly and peacefully with drugs,
or with guns and knives or cars;
but nobody cares if the murder was “violent”

it was still murder.

—#yesallwomen by Amanda Katherine Ricketson (via cyberunfamous)

(Source: -poetic, via ambertree97)